Why Should Anyone Care About Financial Abuse?

With the release of the second book in the Healing from Hidden Abuse series, Exposing Financial Abuse: When Money is a Weapon, I have innocently been asked why this an important topic to cover. It’s a good question but one that, honestly, took me by surprise a little bit each time I was asked.

Why wouldn’t any discussions of calling out abuse be significant and why does this specific one need a qualifier of why it’s important?

After I had been asked this question several times and heard my own reply, I realized that the topic of financial exploitation and abuse really does have a long way to go before it is seen as a “legitimate” form of domestic violence and doesn’t require an explanation of why someone would write a book about it. I am beginning to realize why very few books are currently published on the topic of financial abuse within personal relationships. Sure, there are books on elder abuse and ponzi schemes. but I have found very little research or published works on this particular genre. Part of my motivation for writing Exposing Financial Abuse was to fill the gap in published information.

We would never ask authors who write about physical abuse why it is an important topic to cover.  It would actually be an offensive question. Financial abuse should be no different. The lasting impact on the survivor and society as a whole are enormous. How? Let’s take a look and maybe people will no longer have a reason to ask why financial abuse is an important topic to cover, and see it in the same dangerous light as physical harm perpetrated by an abuser.

I live in a world of therapy and recovery where harm done to others is enough reason to educate oneself on the topic. The devastation itself doesn’t have to walk up to our own front door and barge in to make it something that is concerning to me and my colleagues in the field of trauma-informed care. However, the larger world around us needs to know why financial abuse happening to someone else should be of importance to them personally. If we don’t experience it, sometimes we have a hard time caring that others do.

Financial abuse leads to poverty

Within the pages of Exposing Financial Abuse, raw and unedited survivor stories are the main focus and serve as the foundation of the book. During the research prep stage, I read close to 2000 individual experiences of financial abuse, and then protection and restoration. That’s a lot of data on this topic and I learned so much.

One common theme among the survivors who participated in the research project was the complete financial devastation that took place when an abuser overtly or covertly gained control over the victim’s finances. This often leads to living at or below what would be considered the poverty level. When basic needs become scarce, survivors do what they must to take care of themselves and their children. That often includes needing temporary government assistance, the help of local community food banks, loans from family members, and the use of payday loans that have spiked interest rates. In the Chapter titled Basic Needs, I cover story after story of exactly how financial abuse leads to living at poverty levels; even when the family income does not warrant it.

Financial abuse leads to debt accumulation

Targets of financial exploitation have had their names and personal data used to open accounts where the debt balance was run up and the abuser disappeared when the bill arrived. On the other side of the coin, survivors of economic exploitation sometimes will turn to their credit cards to help fill the gap financially where the abuser left a damaging hole. Personal debt to income ratios not only impact the individual but unpaid debt that must be taken at a loss by the company can have a snowball impact on the economy as a whole.

Financial abuse often includes criminal behaviors

Within Exposing Financial Abuse, a whole chapter is devoted to the illegal and fraudulent activities perpetrated by abusers who use money as a weapon. If financial abuse happening to someone else really isn’t of interest to some people, I certainly hope crimes being committed within our neighborhoods and among friend groups is enough to get the attention of many people.

A society that looks the other way regarding personal financial crimes runs the risk of becoming numb to other crimes. This is a very dangerous path to be headed down.

Financial abuse is rampant within the Family Court system and kids are suffering because of it. 

Right now, today, some parents are hiding their true income and assets so that it will not be included in the calculations for child support payments and they can pay the least amount each month. That is disgraceful and should not be tolerated within our communities. When deadbeat parents refuse to pay their legal, ethical share to the care and support of their children, it leads to the responsible parent having the full financial burden. Often, it is more than one person can manage and debt begins to accumulate and families inch closer to the poverty line. This takes place even when the responsible parent is working full-time. It is very expensive to just maintain adequate food, clothing, shelter, transportation, and medical care. Those are basics needs to raise children. Never mind any added wants or desires.

I have barely tipped the iceberg of why relational financial abuse is an important topic to cover. I hope others with greater specialized education will pick the ball up and run with it. We need a collective approach to addressing this hidden abuse that has devastating consequences for us all; even if our lives have never been directly touched by this form of harm. It does frame how we function as a society.

Keep Dreaming Big!

Shannon

 

Managing Psychological Trauma

“Welcome to The Mental Breakdown and Psychreg Podcast! Today, Dr. Berney and Dr. Marshall have the pleasure of interviewing Ms. Shannon Thomas, a licensed clinical social work supervisor, the owner and lead therapist of an award-winning private practice-counseling agency in Southlake, Texas and best-selling author of ‘Healing from Hidden Abuse: A Journey Through the Stages of Recovery from Psychological Abuse.'”

MyNDTalk with Dr. Pamela Brewer

“Shannon Thomas discusses her important book about something ugly, hidden, and difficult to describe. Psychological abuse. How is it possible that one person can gain so much power to destroy another person’s sense of worth, safety, and sanity? Shannon tells you how, but more importantly, she gives you a roadmap that helps you wake up, break free, heal, and rebuild what feels like your shattered life.”

MyNDTalk – Healing from Hidden Abuse – Shannon Thomas

 

 

 

Because of the Narcissist, I Know – By Monica Dane

I know what love-bombing is

I know what idealizing means

I know that “gaslighting” was not just a movie

I know where “hoovering” gets its name

I know what it’s like to be “projected” on

I know that being “mirrored” doesn’t involve an actual mirror

I know what it’s like to be lied to

I know what it’s like to feel trapped

I know and have experienced being “hollowed”

I know and can recognize “flying monkeys”

I know what “intermittent reinforcement” is

I know what it feels like to be devalued

I know what it feels like to be disrespected

I know what it feels like to not be cherished

I know what it’s like to be criticized and condemned

I know what it’s like to be spoken to in a condescending tone

I know what it feels like to be emotionally abandoned

I know what it’s like to see my children witness psychological abuse

I know what it’s like to not do anything right no matter how hard you try

I know that a “smear campaign” happens outside of the political arena

I know that drama isn’t always on stage

I know what a lack of empathy in a person looks like

I know that life-sucking vampires really exist

I know what it’s like to see a toddler in a grown man’s body

I know that “discard” has nothing to do with a deck of cards

I know how important “NO CONTACT” is

I know that at times “detached contact” is best

I know what boundaries are and that they were completely disregarded

I know that abuse doesn’t always leave scars and bruises

I know what it’s like to see evil in human form

I know that “Jekyl and Hyde” is not just a great musical

I know what a “mask” is and have seen it taken on and off

I know what codependency is and realized I became one

I know what “covert” and “overt” are

I know what it feels like to “walk on egg-shells”

I know what it feels like to think you’re going crazy

I know that “triangulating” is not a symbol played in music class

I know what it feels like to stop trusting people

I know what it feels like to be skeptical of everyone

I know what it feels like to be anxious all of the time

I know what it feels like to be isolated and alone

I know what it’s like to be controlled

I know what it’s like to want to be perfect

I know what it feels like to be a puppet on a string

I know when my prayers changed

I know what it feels like to break free

I know what it feels like to climb out of the pit of despair

I know what it feels like to trust my judgement again

I know what it feels like to educate myself on what I’ve experienced

I know what it feels like to peel back painful but necessary layers of healing

I know what it feels like to not be consumed with anxiety

I know what it feels like to smile

I know what joy feels like when it enters your soul again

I know what it feels like to spend time with my family and friends again

I know what it feels like to restore my relationship with my children

I know and have witnessed my children healing from psychological abuse

I know what it’s like to be independent again and financially not tied to anyone

I know what it’s like to care for my well-being

I know what it’s like to not be depressed

I know what it feels like to be hopeful for mine and my kids future

I know what it’s like to exercise and eat right

I know what it feels like to breathe again

I know what it’s like to not allow a person to signify my worth and beauty

I know what strength and courage look like

I know what it’s like to learn to love again

I know that God loves me…no matter what

I know I can be healed

I know I can be redeemed

I know I can be restored

I know I am a daughter of the Most High

I know I don’t worry about people judging me

I know I no longer judge people who are in/or have been in toxic relationships

I know I no longer judge anyone who chooses divorce

I know I have been there

I know someone needs to hear my story…BEAUTY FROM ASHES 

Pass it on….

Because of the Narcissist, I know by Monica Dane, Certified Life Coach. Monica Dane Coaching – monicadane.com

Adult Bullies: The Calculating Bully

In this series on adult bullies, we have looked at the Accusing Bully who has a need to make you their scapegoat so they don’t have to look at their own shortcomings. We have also examined the Bitter Bully who may have started out as someone close to you, but when your life took off in some great way, the Bitter Bully became threatened. Both of these adult bullies are driven by their insecurities. Not so for the next bully. Calculating Bullies are driven by rage. They want your life full of misery and are willing to be the vessel to make that happen. Wonderful, right?  Even though we may not want to acknowledge that terrible people exist in the world, they do. We are naïve to think we will never cross paths with someone who would love to see us fail.

Who are these Calculating Bullies? They could be a family member, co-worker, someone pretending to be a friend or romantic interest. They can also be people we meet while involved in a ministry or church.  Basically, there are multiple ways a calculating bully can enter your life. My hope is that being able to identify how these folks operate will help you to create solid boundaries around a calculating bully so their poison doesn’t fully engulf your life.

I am often asked why Calculating Bullies set out to pick apart someone’s sense of self-worth and goodness in life. This form of adult bully encompasses both the accusing nature and bitterness of the previous bullies we have already discussed. They take those unpleasant character traits and add gasoline on top.

From my personal experience having run into this type of bully, and as a professional counselor, I believe there are a few key methods the Calculating Bully utilizes and I want to share two with you today.

“You Will Not Have What I Cannot Achieve”

This inner-dialogue is similar to the Bitter Bully but the intensity is different. The Bitter Bully often uses passive-aggressive methods to let you know that your success or joy has stepped on their toes. The Calculating Bully will try to remove those items from your life. They go to great lengths to use flat-out lies about you to smear your reputation. They will call in their troops to further spread the hateful message of the Calculating Bully. They will target you and try to make you look incompetent in whatever way fits the environment. If the Calculating Bully is in a family, they may discredit you as an adult child or parent to your own children. If the bully is within a workplace, the Calculating Bully could sabotage you by going behind you and changing your work to have it include errors that you did not make. If it is in a church environment, the Calculating Bully will spread rumors about you to make leadership question your appropriateness for ministry.

These adult bullies are out for blood. They feel no shame about how they try to reach their goal of destroying you and everything you have achieved, but they have not.

“I Will Make You Think Everyone Hates You”

The Calculating Bully wants you to feel isolated. They desire to know that you feel rejected and left out. It makes them smugly happy. In reality, your rejection is usually just smoke and mirrors. Sometimes they are able to achieve a successful smear campaign and people do actually turn away from you. More often, I have witnessed the Calculating Bully trying to create a false sense of reality. If the adult bully is a former friend, they will encourage people to give you space for a season to let the dust settle on whatever conflict may have happened. The Calculating Bully knows this will land with you as the silent treatment and that’s the goal. In the workplace, this adult bully will purposefully steer other people away from inviting you to go out to lunch or after work together. The Calculating Bully enjoys the moment when you find out that you were excluded. In a family, this bully will flaunt their affection and often times, gifts, intended for other people in the family. You are never honored. Never celebrated. The Calculating Bully in a family with cut you off from the nurturing that all humans desire. This bully likes to see you long for what other family members are receiving right in front of you.

What are you to do if you have a Calculating Bully in your life? Quickly get away from them. Seriously. I know some situations are incredibly difficult to remove yourself from but every effort must be made to put as much distance between yourself and this form of adult bully.

Rarely do these bullies make lasting changes in their behaviors. That would require a tremendous amount of self-reflection and repetitious internal corrections in order to re-wire their internal compass.

A Calculated Bully doesn’t relate to other people in a normal way and that is why they can treat you so poorly. It is truly about them, and not you.

As a therapist, I believe it is therapeutic to engage in the simple of act of acknowledging what we know to be true. As you have read this blog, maybe a particular person has come to mind and you have begun to see that they are not only accusing and bitter, but their ugly actions are actually calculated. If you identified someone as a Calculated Bully, please say out loud the following:

I believe ­­____________________(name of person) is a Calculated Bully.

I believe he/she would like to see my life ruined.

I will stop giving ____________________(name of person) the benefit of the doubt each time I am hurt by her/him.

I will use everything available to me to put healthy distance between myself and ____________________(name of person).

I deserve to have people in my life who treat me with kindness and care.

My hope is that every Calculating Bully will face clear and solid boundaries from the people around them. It won’t change the bully’s toxic behaviors, but fewer people will have their lives negatively impacted. We must stop giving harmful people full access to our lives and hearts.

Keep dreaming big!

Shannon